ON THE GROUND

On the Ground (OTG) is MUCC’s volunteer wildlife habitat improvement program. Launched in 2013 with six pilot projects, it won Outdoor Life magazine’s inaugural Open Country award for its partnership with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR). In 2016, the OTG program expanded to include On the Ground Junior (OTG Jr.), which is a fully-funded field-trip program for schools. This program brings the classroom outdoors and engages students in habitat projects at state game areas near their schools and homes. Most recently, MUCC was awarded the 2018 Pillar Award for Land Use from the Mid-Michigan Environmental Action Council for the OTG Jr. program. DNR wildlife biologists and technicians have been instrumental in developing and coordinating the 151 projects the OTG programs have accomplished throughout the state.

We partner with groups like Metro-West Steelheaders, National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, Ruffed Grouse Society and the National Wildlife Federation; business and media partners such Mike Avery Outdoor Magazine, Consumers Energy and the Michigan Wildlife Council; and numerous local conservation clubs, college environmental clubs and youth groups. Most importantly, the OTG program gives volunteers the opportunity to directly enhance habitat for turkeys, deer, bear, elk, waterfowl, snowshoe hare, and other game species on public land. Sportfish and countless non-game species also benefit from the habitat work completed.

More than 3,100 volunteers have improved wildlife habitat through weekend projects like building brush piles, removing invasive trees, restoring grassland habitat through native flower and grass plantings, installing fish spawning structures, hinge-cutting trees for deer and snowshoe hare, installing wood duck boxes, regenerating aspen stands, performing river clean-ups and planting a variety of trees for wildlife food and cover.

OTG hosts projects which improve habitat for wildlife on public land. Through this program, hunters, anglers, trappers and outdoor enthusiasts of all kinds have the opportunity to donate their time for the benefit of the species they enjoy. The work completed by volunteers and wildlife professionals shows the general public that Michiganders are true conservationists and demonstrates how hunting license dollars are put to use. 

On the Ground is funded by a Memorandum of Agreement with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Division.

Upcoming Events

COMPLETED OTG EVENTS IN FY 2021

Please click on the event title for more information about each project.

 

October 4, 2020 - Fulton State Game Area

OTG returned to the field to kick off the planting of 2,500 native trees at the Fulton State Game Area. These trees were funded by the Consumers Energy Foundation and will enhance habitat for diverse wildlife. Originally designed to be a volunteer event for Consumers Energy staff during Earth Day this past April, restrictions due to COVID-19 prevented the original volunteers from attending the event and it was postponed until October. Since COVID-19 restrictions remained in place, it was determined that the event would make a great day for the MUCC field team to get outdoors and kick-start the planting of the trees.

 

October 10, 2020 - Petersburg State Game Area

OTG partnered with The Nature Conservancy at the Petersburg State Game Area to plant the native wildflower blazing star. A total of 450 blazing star plants were planted in two oak openings within the SGA by 18 volunteers. Valuable to naturalists and hunters alike, the Petersburg State Game Area is home to diverse wildlife. From rare insects like the blazing star borer moth and Karner blue butterfly to the abundant white-tailed deer and wild turkey, this area has benefited greatly from habitat restoration efforts by many conservation organizations.

 

October 24, 2020 - Kalkaska

A total of 22 volunteers gathered in Kalkaska to plant, mulch and fence 90 mature soft mast-producing trees to enhance habitat for wildlife in Kalkaska. These fruit trees were planted throughout five different openings within the state forest along Sunset Trail Road and will benefit a variety of wildlife that include ruffed grouse, wild turkey, white-tailed deer, songbirds and an abundance of other game and non-game species.